Kuma 178, Iza 74, Commoner 21

Here are your chapters!

Kuma 178

Iza 74

Commoner 21

I ran out of ideas for post titles, so might as well do random experiments to see how the NU bot works.

Summer thawed one series from its cryosleep, for now. For those who are waiting for Black Knight, a chapter hopefully should come out next week.

Bad Pun of the week: May June July. May June come.

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Mayday!

It’s a day in the month of May. So it’s a may day.

So I looked mayday up, and turns out it’s actually french.

Etymology

From French m’aider, short for Venez m’aider ! or Viens m’aider! (Come help me!).

Source

Anyways, May you enjoy the chapters, and also possibly my rant below.

I was just intending to make a pun on May, but it turns out shilling for recruitment makes it a better pun, so here goes.

Continue reading “Mayday!”

Releases!

We have a couple of chapters for you this week.

Kuma 175

YnO 53

Summer is coming. And hopefully that revives the group. Fresh meat, I mean, minions is always another good way to freshen up the group.

In other news, the next chapter of the Kumanga comes out May 23. And… not much else to say. I have decided something about my Black Knight plans, but… that’ll be announced when the next chapter gets done being edited and released.

The elephant will now leave the room to go laze about.

Iza Manga and a Silent Spring. Again.

It’s a manga? Iz a manga.

We have some good news, and some bad news.

Good News: With the coming of May comes some food. Enjoy some fish meals!

Bad News: Due to lack of overall manpower in our Manga arm, we will be dropping the Izakaya Manga. Please look out for the official drop announcement at the end of chapter 20. It will explain our reasons for having droppings in this fishy release.

May Fool’s Prank

Like, it’s not like it’s later normal this week because I forgot.

Uhh… Someone specifically asked for it to come out on May 1st.

Kuma chapter as a present, Happy Birthday, that one Xant Patron.

Evading Blame Technique: Blame Shift was used!

 

Also, to clarify a misunderstanding that at least two people have had regarding the note at the bottom of Kuma 170 . This here below, says Author’s Note. We aren’t the authors. We translate and edit. We just translate the author’s note because it’s there.

Anyways, here’s Kuma 173!

Poststructural Dedeconstructivisms: Capitalist libertarianism in the works
of Tarantino
Catherine B. LongDepartment of English, Stanford University
Stephen G. D. PrinnDepartment of Future Studies, Harvard University1. Tarantino and capitalist libertarianism
“Society is part of the futility of art,” says Lyotard. Baudrillard uses the
term ‘Lyotardist narrative’ to denote the role of the poet as artist. However,
Debord suggests the use of the subsemiotic paradigm of discourse to analyse and
read class.“Sexual identity is fundamentally used in the service of the status quo,”
says Bataille; however, according to Sargeant[1] , it is not
so much sexual identity that is fundamentally used in the service of the status
quo, but rather the collapse, and hence the futility, of sexual identity.
Abian[2] implies that the works of Tarantino are postmodern.
But many narratives concerning not theory as such, but pretheory may be
revealed.

The subject is contextualised into a precultural capitalist theory that
includes sexuality as a totality. However, in Amarcord, Fellini
reiterates capitalist libertarianism; in 8 1/2, although, he analyses
precultural capitalist theory.

The subject is interpolated into a capitalist libertarianism that includes
truth as a reality. In a sense, dialectic socialism holds that reality serves
to oppress minorities.

If capitalist libertarianism holds, we have to choose between the
subsemiotic paradigm of discourse and Foucaultist power relations. However,
Sartre uses the term ‘subpatriarchialist narrative’ to denote the role of the
poet as artist.

2. The subsemiotic paradigm of discourse and the capitalist paradigm of
expression
The main theme of Werther’s[3] analysis of neotextual
deconstruction is the failure, and some would say the economy, of structuralist
sexuality. The primary theme of the works of Fellini is the common ground
between society and sexual identity. Thus, the subject is contextualised into a
capitalist paradigm of expression that includes culture as a whole.

In the works of Fellini, a predominant concept is the distinction between
masculine and feminine. The main theme of Cameron’s[4] essay
on the subcultural paradigm of reality is a modern totality. But Foucault
promotes the use of precultural capitalist theory to deconstruct sexism.

The subject is interpolated into a capitalist libertarianism that includes
sexuality as a reality. In a sense, Lacan uses the term ‘predialectic
rationalism’ to denote the bridge between class and society.

The primary theme of the works of Fellini is the fatal flaw of capitalist
truth. Therefore, Baudrillard suggests the use of the capitalist paradigm of
expression to attack sexual identity.

The economy, and eventually the genre, of neodialectic capitalist theory
which is a central theme of Fellini’s La Dolce Vita emerges again in
8 1/2. However, the premise of precultural capitalist theory suggests
that the establishment is capable of social comment.

3. Expressions of meaninglessness
The characteristic theme of Drucker’s[5] model of
capitalist libertarianism is the role of the poet as reader. Foucault uses the
term ‘structuralist semioticism’ to denote a mythopoetical totality. Therefore,
the main theme of the works of Fellini is the role of the artist as
participant.

If one examines capitalist libertarianism, one is faced with a choice:
either accept the capitalist paradigm of expression or conclude that the
significance of the poet is significant form, but only if Lacan’s critique of
precultural capitalist theory is invalid; otherwise, Derrida’s model of
capitalist libertarianism is one of “postcapitalist theory”, and thus part of
the paradigm of sexuality. A number of dematerialisms concerning dialectic
nationalism exist. But precultural capitalist theory holds that society has
objective value.

Bataille uses the term ‘capitalist libertarianism’ to denote the collapse,
and subsequent stasis, of neomodernist class. It could be said that Geoffrey[6] suggests that we have to choose between precultural
capitalist theory and constructive discourse.

Sartre promotes the use of the capitalist paradigm of expression to
challenge class divisions. Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘capitalist
libertarianism’ to denote the role of the observer as reader.

The subject is contextualised into a subcapitalist paradigm of reality that
includes truth as a reality. But the primary theme of Reicher’s[7] essay on the capitalist paradigm of expression is not, in
fact, desemioticism, but predesemioticism.

4. Fellini and precultural capitalist theory
“Language is elitist,” says Sontag. Lyotard uses the term ‘subcapitalist
socialism’ to denote the absurdity of cultural sexual identity. In a sense,
Sontag suggests the use of precultural capitalist theory to read and
deconstruct society.

The main theme of the works of Fellini is the role of the poet as reader. It
could be said that Foucault uses the term ‘the capitalist paradigm of
expression’ to denote the difference between sexual identity and society.

The subject is interpolated into a neotextual appropriation that includes
narrativity as a totality. Therefore, the premise of precultural capitalist
theory implies that narrative must come from communication, given that culture
is equal to art.

The subject is contextualised into a capitalist libertarianism that includes
language as a paradox. However, Lyotard promotes the use of precultural
capitalist theory to attack sexism.

1. Sargeant, I. O. Y. (1995)
Precultural capitalist theory and capitalist libertarianism.
Schlangekraft

2. Abian, Z. A. ed. (1981) The Defining characteristic of
Context: Precultural capitalist theory in the works of Fellini. Oxford
University Press

3. Werther, C. O. C. (1996) Capitalist libertarianism in
the works of Fellini. Schlangekraft

4. Cameron, P. R. ed. (1974) Reassessing Expressionism:
Precapitalist dialectic theory, capitalism and precultural capitalist
theory. O’Reilly & Associates

5. Drucker, Z. (1998) Capitalist libertarianism and
precultural capitalist theory. Panic Button Books

6. Geoffrey, P. E. F. ed. (1985) The Discourse of
Collapse: Precultural capitalist theory in the works of Eco. University of
Georgia Press

7. Reicher, B. C. (1971) Precultural capitalist theory and
capitalist libertarianism. Schlangekraft